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International Journal of Fauna and Biological Studies

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International Journal of Fauna and Biological Studies

International Journal of Fauna and Biological Studies

2023, Vol. 10 Issue 4, Part A

Soil transmitted parasitic infection among school-aged children in some parts of Nasarawa State, Nigeria

Author(s):

Ayuba Scholastica Onyaweyo, Pam Victoria Adamu, Uzoigwe Raphael Ndubuisi, Ombugadu Akwashiki, Abe Eniola Michael, Oluwole Akinola, Abdullahi Nana-Mariam, Ajah Linus, Adejoh Victor Ameh, Ahmed Hussein Oshomah, Aimankhu Oshegale Peter, Maikenti James Ishaku, Aliyu Abdullahi Alhassan, Odey Simon Aboyi, Anyebe Grace Eshikowoicho, Mock Kure Samuel, Kumbak Danjuma, Abdulrahman Itopa Suleiman and Ummulhanni Oyiza Obansa

Abstract:

Soil-transmitted helminths (STH) disease burden is rapidly being identified as a crucial public health problem, especially in developing countries in which children are the most helpless group. Therefore, soil-transmitted parasitic infection in school-aged children in six selected primary schools from two selected Local Government Areas (LGAs) of Nasarawa State, Nigeria was conducted between January and March, 2018. Fecal samples were gotten from 360 school-aged children, 180 from each LGA between ages 5-18. Also, soil samples were gotten from three different areas in each of the school surveyed. The samples were subjected to analysis using standard parasitological techniques of direct smear and concentration. Overall prevalence of STH recorded was 17.5%; age group 9-12 years had the highest prevalence of 18.2% but there was no significant difference in STH prevalence in relation to the six schools sampled (χ2 = 0.38957, DF = 2, P = 0.823). The level of occurrence of STH in relation to sex was not significant (χ2 = 1.3759, DF = 1, P = 0.2408) but more females were infected. Ascaris lumbricoides was the predominant parasites encountered. Geohelminths were more dominant in soil examined from defecation site than those from refuse and playground or sit out sites. The observed hygiene conditions in the schools that predisposes the children to infection includes absence of water in toilets, poor sanitary conditions and bare foot walk. Hence, there is an urgent need for improved modern toilet facilities and good sanitation practice. Also, school health programs like quarterly deworming and health education are hereby recommended.

Pages: 28-33  |  217 Views  65 Downloads


International Journal of Fauna and Biological Studies
How to cite this article:
Ayuba Scholastica Onyaweyo, Pam Victoria Adamu, Uzoigwe Raphael Ndubuisi, Ombugadu Akwashiki, Abe Eniola Michael, Oluwole Akinola, Abdullahi Nana-Mariam, Ajah Linus, Adejoh Victor Ameh, Ahmed Hussein Oshomah, Aimankhu Oshegale Peter, Maikenti James Ishaku, Aliyu Abdullahi Alhassan, Odey Simon Aboyi, Anyebe Grace Eshikowoicho, Mock Kure Samuel, Kumbak Danjuma, Abdulrahman Itopa Suleiman and Ummulhanni Oyiza Obansa. Soil transmitted parasitic infection among school-aged children in some parts of Nasarawa State, Nigeria. Int. J. Fauna Biol. Stud. 2023;10(4):28-33.

International Journal of Fauna and Biological Studies
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